Christopher Titmuss Dharma Blog

A Buddhist Perspective

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An Exploration of the Western version of Mindfulness as a Major Branch of Psychology

The Buddha abides as the original voice of mindfulness. Mindfulness belongs in the body of his teachings/practices. The Buddha’s approach to mindfulness reveals a comprehensive exploration offering a great depth of insight. Continue reading 



The Cost of Thinking Too Much About Yourself. 12 Outcomes and the Resolution

You think about yourself. Then you think more. Then you think even more. Day after day. All this thinking makes  your life difficult. Very difficult. Do not think otherwise.

Meditation contributes to clearing the mind, finding space in the mind, for thought to be clear and succinct.

Here are 12 Outcomes of Thinking Too Much about Yourself. 

You find yourself:

  1. Addicted to comparing yourself with others.
  2. Far away from peace of mind
  3. Feel isolated from what matters.
  4. Feel cut off from closeness with life, nature and people.
  5. Feel lonely.
  6. Feel someone or something is missing in your life.
  7. Keep feeling disappointed with yourself
  8. Keep making yourself unhappy.
  9. Thinking less about needs of others the more you think about yourself.
  10. Unable to handle stress.
  11. What you think and what is seems far apart
  12. Withdrawing from difficult people.

What is the Resolution?

You do not have to be a Buddha to answer the question,

Think less about yourself.

Wake up in the morning with a single resolution.

You do not have to  be a Buddha to know the resolution. This is the resolution.

“Today, I am firmly resolved to think less about myself.”

All this thinking stops you living.

Get back your life.

Develop seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, touching.

Connect. Live.

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www.christophertitmuss.net

Photo shows children meditating in 

our beloved Prajna Vihar School, Bodh Gaya, India



Start an Insight Journal. Free from streams of words about what you think, what you did and who you saw.

We often think of a diary or journal as an account of what did from one day to the next. We might write about our feelings and thoughts about ourselves, another(s) and places.

From time to time, you might uncover an insight when you write about an experience.

An Insight Journal (to give this kind of journal a name) makes insight the whole purpose of the writing. Continue reading 




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