Christopher Titmuss Dharma Blog

A Buddhist Perspective

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An Olive Grove in Devon

One of the signals of the impact of global warming is the decision of a Devon farmer to plant olive groves on his land.

 

There is a certain poignancy in all this. Palestinians especially love dearly their olive groves – taken care of in the same family for centuries upon centuries – a rural culture under threat from the occupation.

 

Mark Dacano, who runs Otter Farm at Honiton in Devon, England, about an hour or so drive from Totnes, says that food grown in the hot climate of the Mediterranean has a real chance to grow in Devon in the west country of England. As the winter frosts get lighter and lighter, he sees the potential for olive groves, almonds and apricots. Continue reading 



Three Monks Come to Stay

In September, I had the privilege of three Buddhist monks staying with me for about four days at my home, here in Totnes, Devon, England. Venerable Phap Son (Brother Michael), an abbot in a monastery in France of the much beloved Thich Nhat Hanh, the 81 year old Vietnamese monk, teacher and prolific Buddhist author, came here with two monks, Venerable Phap Due and Venerable Duc Tang.

 

It was a sheer delight to be with them. All three exuded a depth of mindfulness and kindness that exemplifies the teachings of their teacher, known as Thay. Continue reading 



Last Trip to America

 

I returned last month from the United States. I first visited San Francisco and New York in 1977. At the initial invitation of Jack Kornfield, I taught twice a year for 25 years at IMS, the Vipassana centre, in Barre, Massachusetts and for 25 years in the Bay Area, namely Spirit Rock starting in 1982.

 

Earlier this year, I decided to cut down on my overseas travel from four continents a year to three continents. I have the wish to spend more time serving the Dharma in Totnes, reducing carbon footprints and give more time to dharma writing. Continue reading 



Review of The Master and Margarita

In the opening chapter of The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, the devil suddenly turns up during the 1930’s in Moscow, the capital of the atheistic and state controlled society of Stalinist Russia. Satan appears in the form of a magician, named Woland, who creates havoc in the lives of those around. There are sudden disappearances of individuals or strange deaths. Woland’s terrifying powers of prophecy drive a young poet into a lunatic asylum after the poet fails to find and stop Woland and his gang.

Continue reading 




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