Christopher Titmuss Dharma Blog

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Christopher

A Bag Full of Euros

Immediately after the Buddhafield Festival in Devon, UK, I hurried home, put my clothes in the washing machine, hung my tent out to dry, and then set off on the Monday morning for Le Moulin de Chaves (known as Tapovan in its last life). More than 200 of us in total, adults and kids, joined one week or two weeks of the annual French Dharma Yatra, one of the great annual events of the Sangha. Martin loves to remind people that I have walked every morning and afternoon of the seven yatras, and my only complaint is about the porridge. “Why import Scottish food on a French Yatra” has been my appeal.

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Tea and Strawberries

I attended for the third year the five day Buddhafield Festival near Taunton in Devon, England, last month along with 2500 others. Where else can a dharma teacher go and give an hour or two of teachings in the morning and afternoon, hang out with dharma friends, find shady spots to read a book, and dance in the evening? FWBO provide us with a marquee, called Dharma Inquiry, where we offer teachings. Jane Blissett and Jeanette Karlsson from Brighton, Ken Street and Rick Lawrence from Totnes, all participants in the Dharma Facilitators Programme and myself put on a programme between us in the morning and afternoon. Continue reading 



Walk the Talk

WALK THE TALK

 

I remember listening to Jaya (Ashmore) give her first Dharma talk during our first Dharma Gathering in Sarnath, India in February 1999. Sitting besides me was Nina from Sweden, my partner at the time. At the end of the talk –(on the nature of inter-connectedness, inwardly and outwardly), Nina turned to me and laughed: “Christopher, you’re history. I have a new guru. Her name is Jaya.” Don’t laugh. She meant it. Continue reading 



TWO FILMS IN THE LAST EIGHT MONTHS

Late last year, I sat with unblinking attention to watch Downfall, directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel. This German made film charts the last days of the life of Adolf Hitler (played chillingly by Bruno Ganz) in the Berlin bunker as Hitler swings between ranting around German capitulation to polite small talk like a heavily drugged mental patient as his hand shook incessantly from Parkinson’s disease. Amidst the obscenity of it all, he marries Eva Braun in the midst of hell a couple of days before they commit suicide. Not having been to the cinema for so long, Continue reading 




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